Bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home. Bitten by Witch Fever 2019-03-23

Bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home Rating: 5,6/10 971 reviews

Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

This book is utterly sumptuous. Flour was expensive, so they would resort to adding other things. Hawksley: Around the 1860s, the cases of arsenic poisoning started getting to the newspapers. For those interested in viewing more pieces by Hokusai or any other artist there is a wonderful selection of his artworks on and an containing some fun facts. Hawksley presents the history of Scheele's green and schweinfurt green, pigments created using arsenic, which produced the vibrant shades whose brilliance made them instant favourites with wallpaper designers and householders alike. These colors were exceptionally beautiful, and up until this point, it was not something they could achieve without the use of arsenic. Dangerously beautiful yes, but with an allure that stands the test of time--and should serve as an enduring warning for all.

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Bitten by Witch Fever, Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Victorian Home by Lucinda Hawksley

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

Arsenic, the notorious metalloid, was used in all sorts of products, primarily in the inks and aniline dyes of beautifully printed wallpapers and clothing. From Scheele green's creation in 1775 through the early 1900s, arsenic was found in practically anything meant to have medicinal or colored properties, from candy to clothes to wallpaper. There's no reason to stop using arsenic in wallpaper and dress goods and candy! It presents 275 facsimile samples of wallpaper designs that have all been tested positively for arsenic content. The full page facsimiles of wallpaper alternated with the signatures of text which were shorter in width so that flipping through the book you could easily jump from chapter to chapter for easy reference, which was an interesting take on traditional book construction. Industry Reviews 'A highly original and beautifully illustrated volume that contrasts alluring, poison-laden wallpapers with thought-provoking narrative' - Town Daily 'Like Horrible Histories, but for grown-ups with a keen interest in interior design' - Emerald Street 'Lucinda Hawksley explores the fascinating history of the use of arsenic in textiles and wallpapers. Also, I'm keeping this info handy for next time I get into an argument with someone about the need for environmental regulations and workers' rights.

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Arsenic and Old Tastes Made Victorian Wallpaper Deadly

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

They buy coffee that was also produced by slaves. The workers would dye these tiny, tiny pieces of wool or cotton in green, and while doing so would inhale them and the particles would stick to their lungs. I usually give away books after I've finished reading them, but I can't bea This book is utterly sumptuous. Had you lived in the 19th-century, your home would have been fraught with arsenical dangers, from the wallpaper you hung in your bedroom or the clothes your children wore, to the food served at your dinner table. An illustration from a French medical journal in 1859 shows typical damage caused to hands by exposure to arsenical dyes Wellcome Library, London Rae: By the late Victorian period, though, people had started to figure out it was dangerous? Had you lived in the 19th-century, your home would have been fraught with arsenical dangers, from the wallpaper you hung in your bedroom or the clothes your children wore, to the food served at your dinner table. From an ancient Greek physician using arsenic as an antiseptic to Nero using arsenic to murder Britannicus, to Napoleon rumored to have died in exile from arsenic poisoning, to the death of a Swedish king and the Borgias, the history of the substance crosses borders and social strata.

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Bitten by Witch Fever

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

This book is indeed interesting, not to mention beautifully designed: There are seven short chapters - they look like brochures - in between pages of colour coded plates that show the wallpapers tested for arsenic content. It was the demand the people had which made arsenic-free wallpapers a popular option, and therefore the standard. Great topic, decent writing, poor execution. Or it could be additional Sherlock Holmes stories with the same cause of death. I learned a lot of interesting history on various subjects -- the arts and crafts movement, mining, forensics, working conditions, medicine.

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Bitten By Witchfever: Wallpaper And Arsenic In The Victorian Home

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

While Regency decoration favored more muted color palettes, the Victorians embraced bright, gaudy and electric hues. To view it, legitimately one of the wildest books i've read. I love how much attention this book paid to the workforce creating and dealing with arsenical home goods; many books about household poisons focus entirely on accidental deaths of children who ate contaminated sweets, murderers, or vain socialites killed by their cosmetics. It tells the history of both arsenic and wallpaper -because the two are closely related. Miners were commonly exposed to arsenic, and as technological innovations continued, an ever increasing proportion of American and European society became exposed as well.

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Download Bitten By Witch Fever Wallpaper Arsenic In The Nineteenth Century Home eBook

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

Not that this stopped companies from simply lying and claiming their products were arsenic-free. Lucinda Dickens Hawksley presents the history of Scheele's green and schweinfurt green, pigments created using arsenic, which produced the vibrant shades whose brilliance made them instant favourites with wallpaper designers and householders alike. Additionally, we cannot open packages that are unsolicited or do not have a return address. He thought because no one was ill in his house from the arsenic wallpaper, it must be something else that was causing the sickness. Not only did the mine cause massive environmental damage to the land around it, but many miners died of lung disease,.

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Bitten by Witch Fever, Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Victorian Home by Lucinda Hawksley

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

Spliced between the sections of text are stunning facsimiles of the wallpapers themselves. Second thought: The text pages are just horrible to read. It was fashionable to wear these artificial green wreaths of plants and flowers in your hair that were dyed with arsenic. Bunce Arsenic and Old Lace? All in all, Bitten By Witch Fever is a short micro history on arsenic in wallpaper which I had never known about before. It was used on walls, but also in flypaper, flocked papers, rodent and insect poison, asthma and eczema cream, as a Victorian aphrodisiac, face creams and soaps, artificial decorative fruits and vegetables, dress fabrics, mail labels, playing cards, all sorts of product packaging, and gulp cake icing coloring, candy, and lickable postage stamps. Submission and Solicitation Please note that we cannot accept manuscripts via email. Second thought: The text pages are just horrible to read.

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Bitten by Witch Fever

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

Arsenic was widely used in tints and dyes utilized in home decor and clothing - despite known hazards! Bring a magnifying glass to this book. His career spanned over seven decades but most people are familiar with his later work. Most insidiously, the arsenic-laced pigment made its way into intricately patterned, brightly colored wallpapers and from there, as they became increasingly in vogue, into the Victorian home. Rae: What were a few of these cases? Drawing on contemporary case studies and reports in the press, this book highlights how, by the middle of the century, manufacturers were producing millions of rolls of arsenical wallpaper, with devastating consequences for those working in their factories and for those living in rooms decorated with the deadly designs. It also gives his daughter Eijo Ōi a due attention, an artist of the late 19th century Edo period. The Morgan Library, New York Mary Magdalene c. With the aid of contemporary case studies and reports in the press, she reveals how, by the middle of the century, manufacturers were producing millions of rolls of arsenical wallpaper, with devastating consequences for those working in their factories and for those living in rooms decorated with the deadly designs.

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Arsenic and Old Tastes Made Victorian Wallpaper Deadly

bitten by witch fever wallpaper arsenic in the nineteenth century home

Hawksley presents the history of Scheele's green and schweinfurt green, pigments created using arsenic, which produced the vibrant shades whose brilliance made them instant favourites with wallpaper designers and householders alike. It's always nice to see one of the most famous murderesses from your town to show up as well Goeie Mie! A beautiful book to look at with its creative design and vibrant pages of nineteenth century wallpapers. A recent scholarly account weaves together a tale of 18th-19th century science and psychology, beauty, style, and design, products liability and corporate greed, political cartoonists and iconic leaders of art history, and a scholarly account of an artform and staple of the arts and crafts movement in the most unlikely of collisions with day-to-day life. The shocking story of a deadly trend in Victorian wallpaper design, illustrated by beautiful and previously unseen arsenic-riddled designs from the British National Archives In Germany, in 1814, Wilhelm Sattler created an extremely toxic arsenic and verdigris compound pigment, Schweinfurt green—known also as Paris, Vienna, or emerald green—which became an instant favorite amongst designers and manufacturers the world over, thanks to its versatility in creating enduring yellows, vivid greens, and brilliant blues. The prints of the types of wallpaper available at the time are quite pretty though. A visual feast: five residences designed to house 600 works of art, a collaboration of art collector Schreyer with interior designer Hutton.

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