The cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age. The cybernetics moment : or why we call our age the information age (Book, 2015) [pfactory.in] 2019-01-25

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Ronald R. Kline. The Cybernetics Moment: Or Why We Call Our Age the Information Age.

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

But by the late 1960s, it gradually became clear that the hope of uniting ground-breaking efforts in both the physical and social sciences under the umbrella science of cybernetics was only a hope, not a reality. The discussion is applied to such communication systems as radar relays, telemeters, voice communication systems, servomechanisms, and computers. Cybernetics, Guilhot suggested, here offered the promise of an image of the political that was not dependent on sovereign actors and judgment, one that could do away with decision making in favor of structure, system, and mechanistic process. Operating as both sociologist and historian, Kline traces the contentious debates and writings of those who aspired to bring the rigor of science to social sciences and who hoped to create a universal discipline that transcended a wide variety of existing academic fields. Beyond the numerous schematics that served as the immediate graphic markers of the cybernetic imagination see image , conversation coalesced around a loose conceptual vocabulary—of information, of feedback and system, of mechanism and organism, of governance, error and self-organization—that effectively bridged topics and disciplines, and that gave promise of discerning a certain conceptual coherence in the cybernetic age.

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The Cybernetics Moment

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

Simon did not ignore cybernetics, however; it was the other way around. To answer this question, this article examines the life and work of George A. During 1940 -1960s a large segment of the public came to believe the myth that the computer was an awesome thinking machine. To accomplish this objective, we tie cognitive variables to each level of analysis, including: 1 metacognition—self-evaluation of cognition; 2 performance—objective measures of progress toward a goal state; 3 physiology—indications of cognitive function e. Kline's book presents an invaluable resource that sheds light on the conceptual foundations of some of the most convincing investigations of interactions between human civilization and planetary ecologies. In artificial intelligence, it was cyberneticians such as Wiener who got the philosophy right, even as the symbolists appeared to be making far more concrete progress at the time.

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Ronald R. Kline: The cybernetics moment: Or why we call our age the information age. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015. xi+336pp, $54.95 HB

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

Indeed, just as cybernetics itself declined as it expanded into everything, there is perhaps a risk that in finding cybernetics everywhere we lose hold of the object itself. The symbols and hardware in neurocybernetics resemble more closely the elements of the nervous system and the sense-organs. Readers unfamiliar with Wiener and his work are well advised to start with this well-written and thorough book. The theory developed is applied to show some of the inefficiencies of present communication systems. Such is the work, it seems, that awaits the return to cybernetics.

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The Cybernetics Moment

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

This article explores the framework in which these decisions will be made. These fields are: neurocybernetics and medical cybernetics. Nowhere, that is, until now. But what they did with their respective discoveries could not have been more different. These fields created many new approaches to engineering and management and contributed new ideas to existing academic fields. It takes you there-to the golden age of a new, exciting field.

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R. R. Kline, The Cybernetics Moment. Or Why We Call Our Age the Information Age (New Studies in American Intellectual and Cultural History), Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore (2015)

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

Those who are already familiar will still find much that is new and informative in the thorough research and reasoned interpretations. Kline argues that, for about twenty years after 1950, the growth of cybernetics and information theory and ever-more-powerful computers produced a utopian information narrative—an enthusiasm for information science that influenced natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, humanists, policymakers, public intellectuals, and journalists, all of whom struggled to come to grips with new relationships between humans and intelligent machines. Among other things, The Cybernetics Moment is a fascinating study in how institutional support in the form of grants by both private foundations and the then-new National Science Foundation established in 1950 were critical in forming or not forming new disciplines, as well as encouraging new interactions among established disciplines. Conversely, copyright law maintains accepted patterns of data-production and may hinder increased rates of research and information-based decision-making. In each of these early attempts to graft human action on to grids as well as to bind mechanism to human intelligence, we see the essence of early Cold War cybernetics: the blending of human, mechanical, and natural phenomena on a common canvas. Below, we briefly describe the history and foundations of cybernetics and focus on the field's relationship to the study of human behavior.

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The Cybernetics Moment: Or Why We Call Our Age the Information Age

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

Stefanos Geroulanos Taken together, the papers compellingly demonstrated the ubiquity and diversity of the cybernetic across disciplines, decades, and geographical and political contexts. The range of presenters proved particularly well-suited to such a reevaluation, with some working directly on cybernetics itself, while others approached the subject more obliquely, finding, as it were, the cybernetic in their work even where it had not been named. That it could be all these things and not be wholly incoherent is a testament to the genius of its creator, the mathematician and philosopher Norbert Wiener. The knowledge offered in The Cybernetics Moment will greatly contribute to any reader seeking an enhanced or more comprehensive understanding of our present-day discourse surrounding information, while also providing a detailed and well-warranted history of the science of cybernetics. Bridging these two levels can indeed be crucial in developing a deeper understanding of minds.

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Ronald R. Kline. The Cybernetics Moment: Or Why We Call Our Age the Information Age.

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

Ultimately, he reveals the crucial role played by the cybernetics moment--when cybernetics and information theory were seen as universal sciences--in setting the stage for our current preoccupation with information technologies. When Wiener energetically promoted his concepts and wrote a second book aimed at a more popular audience, he unleashed a chain of events that eventually went in directions he never anticipated. The former is concerned with the pathways of action via sense-organs, neurons and effectors because of the fact that cybernetics is primarily concerned with the construction of theories and models. In this respect, one hopes, the menu will not be the last word, but will point rather to the urgency of continuing the ongoing reevaluation. How, then, did the computer metaphor of mind come to be seen as the root concept underlying a paradigm shift from behaviorism to cognitivism? The concept of entropy, from the second law of thermodynamics, has been used by numerous writers on information theory. An opportunity might be offered by the cogent theme of emotions. Kline argues that, for about twenty years after 1950, the growth of cybernetics and information theory and ever-more-powerful computers produced a utopian information narrative—an enthusiasm for information science that influenced natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, humanists, policymakers, public intellectuals, and journalists, all of whom struggled to come to grips with new relationships between humans and intelligent machines.

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The cybernetics moment : or why we call our age the information age (Book, 2015) [pfactory.in]

the cybernetics moment or why we call our age the information age

This article, while not attempting comprehensive treatment, cites representative extensions of the concept, including its use as metaphor. Histories of a particular technology have similar well-defined limits. Taken together, however, they also raised a question that has long been posed to cybernetics itself. Science urges philosophy to be more empirical and philosophy urges science to be more reflective. Fortunately, Kline is a masterful historian who knows his way around archives and among the ways of researchers, and he explores the many meanings and ramifications of the cybernetics concept from its birth Wiener himself coined the word to the 1980s, by which time most of the early participants had either died or returned to their respective traditional disciplines. There need to be more studies like it. He has published widely in the fields of microwave engineering, atmospheric physics, the history of technology, and engineering ethics.

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